Chris Downey: Design with the blind in mind

What would a city designed for the blind be like? Chris Downey is an architect who went suddenly blind in 2008; he contrasts life in his beloved San Francisco before and after — and shows how the thoughtful designs that enhance his life now might actually make everyone’s life better, sighted or not

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apiScBmE6rA » ].

Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrkrvAUbU9Y » ]

Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action

Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question « Why? » His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers — and as a counterpoint Tivo, which (until a recent court victory that tripled its stock price) appeared to be struggling.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp0HIF3SfI4″ ]

Daphne Koller: What we’re learning from online education

Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free — not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6FvJ6jMGHU » ]

Xavier Damman: How Social Media is Changing the News

Xavier Damman is the CEO and cofounder of Storify, an internet start up company that helps people curate what people post on social media into coherent narratives. Xavier moved from Belgium to San Francisco in 2009 with the goal to make sense of the social web to better inform the world on what is happening as reported by people on the ground using social media. He’s also the founder of HackDemocracy a meetup group which tries to think about the ways technology can impact democracy for the better. He’s a firm believer in sharing, in spreading good ideas and in the power of technology and networks to make the world a better place.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Puro_L7O4eY » ]

Zoe Laughlin: The Performativity of Matter

Artist and maker Zoe Laughlin is a co-founder/director of the Institute of Making and the Materials Library project. She holds an MA from Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design and obtained a PhD in Materials within the Division of Engineering, King’s College London. Working at the interface of the science, art, craft and design of materials, her work ranges from formal experiments with matter, to materials consultancy and large-scale public exhibitions and events with partners including Tate Modern, the Hayward Gallery, the V&A and the Wellcome Collection. Her particular areas of interest are currently The Sound of Materials, The Taste of Materials and The Performativity of Matter, with outputs ranging from theatrical demonstration lectures to the making of instruments and features on both radio and television.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrDNwd1mzC4″ ]

Jason Dunn: Email your hardware to space

Jason Dunn holds two degrees in aerospace engineering and is a young space entrepreneur currently building his second space company, Made In Space. He is leading his team to build and fly the first zero gravity 3D printer for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to launch in 2015 . They are preparing for a future where parts can be built on-demand in space. Once in operation it will mark the first time in history that humanity has manufactured off-Earth.

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1e3ygqo7Ys » ]

Terry Moore: How to tie your shoes

http://www.ted.com Terry Moore found out he’d been tying his shoes the wrong way his whole life. In the spirit of TED, he takes the stage to share a better way. (Historical note: This was the very first 3-minute audience talk given from the TED stage, in 2005.)

[gdlr_video url= »https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAFcV7zuUDA » ]